Relationships between grade distributions for students taking different combinations of 9 to 1 GCSEs - 2018



The graphs below show the grade distributions in the reformed GCSE subjects in 2018.

You can select either an individual subject or a combination of two or three subjects. Selecting a grade range of the first and second subject will filter the candidates shown in the remaining graphs.

For example, selecting 'grade 4 or above' in subject 1 results in only the candidates who were awarded a grade 4 or higher in subject 1 appearing in the graphs for subject 2 and subject 3.








For any feedback on these graphs, please contact data.analytics@ofqual.gov.uk.

Return to the Ofqual Analytics home page.

If you need an accessible version of this information to meet specific accessibility requirements, please email publications@ofqual.gov.uk with details of your request.


1. What do these interactive graphs show?

These graphs allow you to see grade distributions for all full course GCSE 9 to 1 subjects for summer 2018 for students in schools and colleges in England. You can select either an individual subject or a combination of two or three subjects, which shows how performance on one GCSE relates to performance on other GCSEs.

Some examples of information you can find out:

  • for students who attained a grade 7 and above in geography, how many also attained a grade 7 and above in history
  • how many students achieved a grade 9 in mathematics, English language and English literature
  • how many people taking French also took German

  • 2. Which students grades are included in these graphs?

    The graphs are based upon the grades of students of all ages from schools and colleges in England who took at least one full course GCSE (9 to 1) in summer 2018. In each combination of plots, only students who took all of the subjects selected are shown. As students of all ages are included, English language and mathematics include a higher proportion of older students compared to other subjects.

    Please note that in two subject areas (ancient languages and art and design) students may legitimately take more than one qualification within the subject (eg Latin and ancient Greek). For this reason the figure of the number of students may not exactly match the number of grades awarded in these two subject areas.


    3. Why are the grades 9 to 1?

    GCSE qualifications have recently been reformed. As part of this the grading system has changed from A* to G to 9 to 1, with 9 being the highest grade. In 2018 this grading scale was used for GCSEs in 23 subjects which have undergone reform (however, in this app, classical Greek and Latin have been combined into a single 'ancient languages' category). A more detailed explanation of the new GCSE grades can be found here.


    4. What is grade U?

    Where a student receives a 'U' this means 'unclassified' - below the standard required for a grade 1 or above.


    5. What is the source of the data used in the graphs?

    Data was supplied to Ofqual by examination boards in August 2018 shortly before results day. At the point in time Ofqual received the data, all certificates and entries may not have been fully processed. Additionally, the data does not reflect any changes to grades from post-results reviews.


    6. Why are we publishing this data??

    We are publishing this data in the interests of openness and transparency and so that schools, policymakers and other stakeholders can access this data in an interactive manner and explore the grade distributions in the reformed 9 to 1 GCSEs.


    For any feedback on these graphs, please contact data.analytics@ofqual.gov.uk.

    Return to the Ofqual Analytics home page.

    If you need an accessible version of this information to meet specific accessibility requirements, please email publications@ofqual.gov.uk with details of your request.